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Triple Disc Printing Glossary

1000 4 Panel CD Digipaks for only $1575.00

Triple Disc is proud to offer Digipaks at a new lower cost. Step out of that Jewel Box and right into a fully custom full color Digipak. Stand out from the pack and sell more Audio CDs. Digipaks aren't just for major labels anymore. Our corporate clients find that Digipaks are the perfect package for their CD and DVD projects. There is always enough room for graphics to display to match your company's corporate image.

 


Accordion fold: Bindery term, two or more parallel folds which open like an accordion.

Against the grain: At right angles to direction of paper grain.

Back up: Printing the second side of a sheet already printed on one side.

Bind: To fasten sheets or signatures with wire, thread, glue. or by other means.

Bindery: The finishing department of a print shop or firm specializing in finishing printed products.

Bleed: Printing that goes to the edge of the sheet after trimming.

Blind embossing: An image pressed into a sheet without ink or foil.

Bond paper: Strong durable paper grade used for letterheads and business forms.

Brightness: The brilliance or reflectance of paper.

Caliper: Paper thickness in thousandths of an inch.

Coated paper: A clay coated printing paper with a smooth finish.

Color bar: A quality control term regarding the spots of ink color on the tail of a sheet.

Color separations: The process of preparing artwork, photographs, transparencies, or computer generated art for printing by separating into the four primary printing colors.

Contrast: The tonal change in color from light to dark.

Copy: All furnished material or disc used in the production of a printed product.

Cover paper: A heavy printing paper used to cover books, make presentation folders, etc.

Crop: To cut off parts of a picture or image.

Crop marks: Printed lines showing where to trim a printed sheet.

Cyan: One of four standard process colors. The blue color.

Die: Metal rule or imaged block used to cut or place an image on paper in the finishing process.

Die cutting: Cutting images in or out of paper.

Dot: An element of halftones. Using a loupe you will see that printed pictures are made many dots.

Dot gain or spread
: A term used to explain the difference in size between the dot on film v paper.

Drop-out: Portions of artwork that do not print.

Dummy: A rough layout of a printed piece showing position and finished size.

Duotone: A halftone picture made up of two printed colors.

Emboss: Pressing an image into paper so that it will create a raised relief.

Eurobind: A patented method of binding perfect bound books so they will open and lay flatter.

Facsimile transmission: The process of converting graphic images into electronic signals.

Flood: To cover a printed page with ink, varnish, or plastic coating.

Flop: The reverse side of an image.

Foil: A metallic or pigmented coating on plastic sheets or rolls used in foil stamping and foil embossing.

Foil emboss: Foil stamping and embossing a image on paper with a die.

Foil stamping: Using a die to place a metallic or pigmented image on paper.

4-color-process: The process of combining four basic colors to create a printed color picture or colors composed from the basic four colors.
French fold: Two folds at right angles to each other.

Gang Run: Getting the most out of a printing press by using the maximum sheet size to print multiple images or jobs on the same sheet. A way to save money.

Generation: Stages of reproduction from original copy. A first generation reproduction yields the best quality.

Gloss: A shiny look reflecting light.

Grain: The direction in which the paper fiber lie.

Hairline: A very thin line or gap about the width of a hair or 1/100 inch.

Halftone: Converting a continuous tone to dots for printing.

Hard copy: The output of a computer printer, or typed text sent for typesetting.

Highlight: The lightest areas in a picture or halftone.

Image area: Portion of paper on which ink can appear.

Imposition: Positioning printed pages so they will fold in the proper order.

Impression: Putting an image on paper.

Imprint: Adding copy to a previously printed page.

Knock out: To mask out an image.

Laminate: To cover with film, to bond or glue one surface to another.

Lines per inch: The number of rows of dots per inch in a halftone.

Loupe: A magnifying glass used to review a printed image, plate and position film.


Magenta: Process red, one of the basic colors in process color.

Makeready: All the activities required to prepare a press for printing.

Matchprint: Trade name for 3M integral color proof. Matte finish: Dull paper or ink finish.

Micrometer: Instrument used to measure the thickness of different papers.

Middle tones: The tones in a photograph that are approximately half as dark as the shadow area.

Moire: Occurs when screen angles are wrong causing odd patterns in photographs.

Negative: The image on film that makes the white areas of originals black and black areas white.

Offset paper: Term for uncoated book paper.

Opacity: The amount of show-through on a printed sheet. The more opacity or the thicker the paper the less show-through. (The thicker/heavier the paper the higher the cost.)

Overrun or overs:
Copies printed in excess of the specified quantity. (Printing trade terms allow for + - 10 % to represent a completed order.)

Page count: Total number of pages in a book including blanks.

Perfect bind: A type of binding that glues the edge of sheets to a cover like a telephone book, Microsoft software manual, or Country Living Magazine.
Perfecting press: A sheet fed printing press that prints both sides of a sheet in one pass.
Pica: Unit of measure in typesetting. One pica = 1/6 inch.

PMS: The abbreviated name of the Pantone Color Matching System.

PMT: Abbreviated name for photomechanical transfer. Often used to make position prints.

Point: For paper, a unit of thickness equaling 1/1000 inch. for typesetting, a unit of height equaling 1/72 inch.

PostScript: The computer language most recognized by printing devices.

Process blue: The blue or cyan color in process printing.

Process colors: Cyan (blue), magenta (process red), yellow (process yellow), black (process black).

Ragged left: Type that is justified to the right margin and the line lengths vary on the left.

Ragged right: Type that is justified to the left margin and the line lengths vary on the right.

Ream: Five hundred sheets of paper.

Register: To position print in the proper position in relation to the edge of the sheet and to other printing on the same sheet.

Register marks: Cross-hair lines or marks on film, plates, and paper that guide strippers, platemakers, pressmen, and bindery personnel in processing a print order from start to finish.

Reverse: The opposite of what you see. Printing the background of an image. For example; type your name on a piece of paper. The reverse of this would be a black piece of paper with a white name.

Saddle stitch: Binding a booklet or magazine with staples in the seam where it folds.

Score: A crease put on paper to help it fold better.

Shadow: The darkest areas of a photograph.

Show-through: Printing on one side of a sheet that can be seen on the other side of the sheet.

Side stitch:
Binding by stapling along one side of a sheet.

Specifications: A precise description of a print order.

Spine: The binding edge of a book or publication.

Spot varnish: Varnish used to hilight a specific part of the printed sheet.

Stamping: Term for foil stamping.

Stock: The material to be printed.

Substrate: Any surface on which printing is done.

Text paper: Grades of uncoated paper with textured surfaces.

Tints: A shade of a single color or combined colors.

Transparency: A positive photographic slide on film allowing light to pass through.

Transparent ink: A printing ink that does not conceal the color under it.

Trapping: The ability to print one ink over the other.

Trim marks: Similar to crop or register marks. These marks show where to trim the printed sheet.

Trim size: The final size of one printed image after the last trim is made.

Under-run: Production of fewer copies than ordered. See over run.

Up: Printing two or three up means printing multiple copies of the same image on the same sheet.

UV coating: Liquid laminate bonded and cured with ultraviolet light. Environmentally friendly.

Varnish: A clear liquid applied to printed surfaces for looks and protection. (UV coating looks better.)

Watermark: A distinctive design created in paper at the time of manufacture that can be easily seen by holding the paper up to a light.

With the grain: Folding or feeding paper into the press or folder parallel to the grain of the paper.

   
   


Triple Disc Takes the Confusion out of CD & DVD Manufacturing.

Triple Disc is a full service CD and DVD manufacturer that provides CD and DVD replication and duplication and is committed to superior customer service and support. We are dedicated to making your CD or DVD project a headache free on time success.  We have been providing CD and DVD mass reproduction since 1995.Triple Disc seperates itself from the rest of the CD and DVD industry by going above and beyond to meet our customers needs. Triple Disc is proud to offer some of the fastest turn times in the industry. We can turn replicated CDs and DVDs in as little as 2 business days. 24 Hour turns for CD and DVD Duplication runs (rush charges may apply). We offer presales support for all CD and DVD projects.

Triple Disc is dedicated to supporting the client from start to finish. Our knowledge sales staff will walk you through the entire process from getting you a custom quote or answering your graphic design questions on the phone or via email.  We will help you determine if you need Replication or Duplication and help you determine the best packaging option to meet your specific CD or DVD projects needs. Triple Disc has created a customer service support system second to none. 

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